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NEWSLETTER 43 - April 1990

 

Meeting of the committee of the ILAB on Tuesday, February 28, 1989

2.30-17.45 p.m. at Hotel Pulitzer Amsterdam

 

Present: All members of the Committee. The President of Honour Bob de Graaf, and Past President Hans Bagger.

 

1. Approval of the Minutes of the Paris Congress 1988: They were approved. Hans Bagger asked to add in the Newsletter the following dates:

1993                        Presidents' Meeting in Canada

1994                        Congress and Bookfair in the Netherlands.

 

2. President's Report:

The President cordially welcomed the newly elected members of the committee, Mitsuo Nitta and Vittorio Soave, as well as President of Honour Bob de Graaf and Past-President Hans Bagger. He said that in contrast we had now to say farewell to three people whose deaths had occurred since the Paris Congress: Denise Tulkens, wife of one of the Presidents of Honour; Hans Peter Kraus, one of the most important and successful booksellers of his generation; and Fernand de Nobele, a President of Honour, to whom the League owed much of its success.

The committee observed a short period of silence in respectful memory of these former colleagues.

SLAM had reported that M. Alain Nicolas had succeeded Mme Laffitte as President of that association. Mr. Rota had sent M. Nicolas a message of congratulation and good wishes.

He said that not all news from national associations reaches the committee so quickly. He had it in mind to ask each committee member to be responsible for close liaison with specific associations but in the meantime it was agreed that he should write to all national presidents to urge them to ensure that there was continuity in their relations with the League and that when new people took over they should be sure that the League was informed.

The President referred with pleasure and gratitude to the enormous success of the Congress and Fair in Paris and again complimented SLAM and its charming president, Mme Laffitte, on the arrangements.

As part of his plan to raise awareness of the League, both among members of national associations, and the book world at large, he had been sending messages of good wishes to the organisers of book fairs sponsored by member associations. The committee agreed that this practice should continue.

The supply of plaques bearing the League's badge had now been sold out. Burnham Signs had given an estimate to supply 50 more at £ 5.65 each plus V A T. The committee accepted this estimate and noted that the American association was prepared to hold a small stock for resale locally.

The President thought that this was a good time to send a press release concerning the Bibliographical Prize to appropriate journals. This was agreed. At this point Mr. Anton Gerits volunteered to serve as Press Officer for the League, an offer which was gladly accepted.

The President reminded the meeting that the committee had a duty under the rules of the League to put forward its own nominations for elections to the committee, national associations then having the option to suggest alternative candidates.

Since all seven elected members of the committee were voted into office in September 1988, the next election would not normally be until the Presidents' Meeting in 1991. Nevertheless the President would keep the item on the agenda regularly so that there was time for full consultation. Mr. Rota next raised the question of recognition of the services of members who had worked especially long and hard for the League but who were not eligible to become Presidents of Honour. Various possibilities were discussed.

The possibility to nominate Honorary Members, e.g. those who have rendered continual or exceptional services to the League, is mentioned in the 'Rules of the League', page 6, point IV, 16 c. According to this, it is open to individual associations or to the committee to nominate deserving members in the same way as they nominate Presidents of Honour.

It was finally agreed that honouring one and not another might be thought unfair and that no action should be taken at the present time.

The President then raised the question of the reported forgery of various manuscript and printed documents in Texas. The committee accepted that this was a matter of general concern. Mr. Weinstein reported on the action already taken by the ABAA. After lengthy discussion the following resolution was put to the committee and unanimously adopted:

The committee of the International League of Antiquarian Booksellers learned with concern of the forging of various printed and manuscript documents relating to the history of Texas. Mindful of the League's role as the upholder of the highest standards of integrity and of expertise, the committee welcomed the prompt response of the Antiquarian Booksellers' Association of America and urges the ABAA's board of governors to do all in its power to aid the identification and punishment of those responsible for the betrayal of the ideals which are close to the League's heart. To that end the committee of the League asks the President of the ABAA to give a further report on the matter when the Presidents of all the member associations of the League meet in Switzerland in September 1989.

 

3· Treasurer's Report

As mentioned in the minutes of the General Assembly in Paris the League had planned to work out a new basis for calculating the subscriptions and Mr. Weinstein reported on various ideas. It was put up for discussion that every association would pay a minimum rate of subscription and then would be taxed according to its membership. A final formulation, probably a compromise between these two points, would be presented by Mr. Weinstein in Yverdon.

Anton Gerits asked for an advance payment of £ 1,000,-. This would give him the chance to settle the Newsletter costs immediately thus saving from discounts. Mr. Weinstein approved of this and promised an immediate transfer.

 

4. Newsletter Report

Anton Gerits reported that in the next issue of the Newsletter the history of the Danish Association was to be published and in the issue after that the third part of the history of the French association. M. Loeb-Laroque was ready to take care of this third part. Apart from that, it was intended to publish M. Oberle' speech which he had given at the inaugural ceremony of the Brunet Plaque.

In addition to the advertisements of antiquarian bookdealers, it was agreed to accept also those of bibliographical publishers. The editor of the Newsletter promised to contact these publishers and to draw their attention to that possibility.

 

5. Bibliographical Prize

The newly printed leaflets for the 'Tenth Triennial Prize for Bibliography' had been dispatched to Dr. Kocher-Benzing. who promised to send them off in due course.

In future the League would be represented on the jury by Dr. Kocher-Benzing and John Lawson as before, and also by Konrad Meuschel. Dr. Vittorio Soave and Mr. Nitta proposed that a letter be sent to all candidates thanking them for their contributions. This proposal was generally agreed on. Because of the importance of the prize for the League's prestige and also because of it's interest for scholarship, it was suggested to improve the publicity for the prize, especially in bibliographical periodicals. As mentioned in the President's report, Anton Gerits was to take charge of this.

 

6. Dictionary

The work on the dictionary advanced quite well in spite of a few difficulties. Dr. Soave pointed out some fundamental differences between the English and the French text: For instance, there were quite a number of words which were not identical with each other and there were other words which were repeatedly used for different meanings. It was absolutely necessary to undertake the revision very thoroughly.

John Lawson promised to go through the English and Spanish text once again and Hans Bagger promised to attend to the Danish text. Mr. Nitta had arranged to revise the Japanese text and Dr. Soave had almost concluded the Italian one.

The travelling costs resulting from the work on the dictionary would be settled by Mr. Weinstein. In his statement of February 1989 Hans Bagger had listed the sums which were provided for the Bibliographical Prize.

 

7. Security

A serious theft was committed during the packing up after the Boston Bookfair. The stolen books were to be listed and every association was to be informed accordingly. Anthony Rota drew the committee's attention to a report of February 1989 in the Daily Telegraph where Scotland Yard announced the re-formation of its specialist Art and Antiques Squad.

 

8. Directory

Mr. Reiss attended the meeting in Mr. Brumme's place and reported on the progress of the new directory. There had been difficulties with the contacts of various associations. From 7 associations no answer had been received. Personal contact was taken up with two countries, so that there were 5 countries left: Belgium, Brazil, France, Japan and Norway.

M. Loeb-Laroque explained that the French association has had a new board and after his return to Paris he would take up contact with them.

Hans Bagger would telephone the Norwegian association and Anton Gerits was ready to do the same in Belgium, while Anthony Rota would write to the Brazil association. Mr. Nitta would contact the Japanese association.

The questionnaires had been dispatched on schedule, order forms for advertisements. (Advertisements were accepted from the League's members only).

Compared with 1986 it had turned out that about 30% of the addresses in the directory had changed. The old text of the directory could therefore no longer be used and it was absolutely vital that the new data reached Mr. Brumme in time. So every member was urgently asked to fill-out the questionnaire and to send it back immediately. The contacts in every country were also asked to see to this - if necessary by phone.

Answering Mr. Nitta's question, Mr. Reiss informed the committee that the price for the directory was to be fixed at US£ 20,- if it had a circulation of 10,000 copies.

 

9. Future Congresses and Presidents' Meetings

1990 - Japan, Congress

1991 - Denmark, Presidents' Meeting

1992 - Germany, Congress

1993 - Canada, Presidents' Meeting

1994 - Netherlands, Congress

Mr. Rota informed the committee about the programme of the next Presidents' Meeting taking place from September 14 to 16, 1989, in Yverdon/Switzerland.

Mr. Nitta spoke about the 30th Congress in Japan which was expected to take place from September 30, to October 7, 1990, in Tokyo. He distributed a first draft of the programme of the Congress and also of the 13th international book fair. Among other things, the very interesting programme offered a ride to Hakone by the Chartered Train; a sightseeing tour of Hakone and the Fuji Area; a Japanese Night; and a trip to the Moa Art Museum; further a lecture on History of Japanese Printing, a visit to libraries and a Farewell Diner at Chinzanso Garden Restaurant. Because of the Jewish religious holiday of Yom Kippur, it was not possible to adhere to the planned dates for the Japanese Congress which was to have taken place from 30th September to 7th October in 1990.

In agreement with the Japanese association, the committee had changed the dates. The Congress and Bookfair in Japan will now take place from 7th October to 14th October in 1990.

The president would write to all national associations and inform them accordingly.

 

10. Any other business

 There was no other business.

 

 

Meeting of the committee of the ILAB on Thursday, September 14, 1989,

9.30 to 12.00 a.m. at the Grand Hotel des Bains in Yverdon

 

1. Present: All members of the committee. The Presidents of Honour Bob de Graaf, Dr. Kocher-Benzing, and John Lawson.

 

2. Approval of the Minutes of the Committee Meeting in Amsterdam on February 28, 1989. They were approved.

 

3. Presidents' Report

See also the minutes of the Presidents' Meeting. The President informed the committee that 3 countries had elected a new president:

Belgium: Mr. Claude van Look

Canada: Mr. Michael Brisebois

Norway: Mr. Rolf Warendorph

The Belgian association had changed its name and now designated itself as follows: Chambre professionelle Belge de la Librairie Ancienne et Moderne Belgische Bcrocpskarner van Antiquaren

 

4. Treasurer's Report

The treasurer distributed to all the statement of cash receipts and disbursements from January 1, to June 30th, 1989. He explained it to the audience and expressed his satisfaction with the present situation.

 

5. Annual Subscription

To avoid discussions every year about subscriptions Mr. Weinstein proposed to introduce a so-called “bookfair-fee” and he mentioned as example the United States where every exhibitor at a bookfair being organized by the ABAA had to pay a fee of $ 100.00 to the ABAA for their support. In this sense he made the proposal that all national associations affiliated to the League should ask each exhibitor at each bookfair for the fee of $ 10.00 in support of the League. The same would apply to those bookfairs which take place every second year following the League's congress. This fee of $ 10.00 would be collected from every exhibitor even if two booksellers were sharing a booth.

The members of the committee agreed with this suggestion. The discussions about subscriptions arising every year could possibly be avoided; the final amount realised would probably be about $ 10,000.00 a year and this sum could cover the financial needs of the League in the near future. The expected high costs involved with the publication of the League's dictionary could possibly be partly covered by this way.

That only participants of bookfairs were charged with this trivial fee of $ 10.00 Mr. Weinstein justified with the fact that exhibitors would specially profit from the League's or the perspective association's renown and status.

In this connection he suggested to accept point 14 of the agenda proposed by the Australian and New-Zealand association of Antiquarian Booksellers, and to add that all national bookfairs should in future be organized under the “umbrella protection” of the League. To this end he proposed that the following ILAB statement be prominently displayed at all fairs, in all advertisements etc.:

“This bookfair is officially sanctioned by the International League of Antiquarian Booksellers, the largest trade organization of its kind in the world.

This means that the consumer can rely upon the experience and professionalism of the participating dealers and the authenticity of the items available for purchase. Simply stated, all books, manuscripts and related material have been carefully examined for completeness and bibliographical accuracy.

The level of inspection will ordinarily depend upon the value of the item (s) offered. Sometimes short notations of defects are lightly pencilled near the price. More valuable material is usually described in detail on slips that are loosely inserted. Please read them carefully.

Any item is returnable for a full cash refund if defects or bibliographical inaccuracies are found, providing:

1. inspection is made and reported within thirty days of receipt (An immediate phone call or fax is urged); and

2. material is returned in the same condition as when it was sold.

All ILAB members are obliged to abide by this warranty, and any violator is subject to expulsion from the League. Address inquiries to: (The national association).”

Members of the committee underlined that the Stuttgart bookfair had a special position - as had already been discussed at the Presidents' Meeting in Vienna in 1988 and at the Committee Meeting in Stuttgart 1989. Taking this into consideration the president of the German association ought to be asked in the afternoon for his point of view.

Dr. Soave informed the committee that the Italian association intended to organize a bookfair every year beginning in 1990. The first bookfair was to take place in Milan in March 1990 and he was ready to be the first to discuss with exhibitors the fee of $ 10.00.

Mr. Wcinstein would ask each national association for a schedule stating the number of fairs it held. This would enable him to make exact calculations.

The committee agreed on putting this proposal up for discussion in the Presidents' Meeting and asking them for their vote.

 

6. Newsletter. Editor's Report

Mr. Gerits planned to publish the next Newsletter in January or February 1990, but so far no new contributions had been handed in. The 3rd part of the French history was still missing. Mr. Loeb-Laroque agreed to look into this. The history of the Swiss association had just been described in an excellent way by Jorg Schafer in a booklet published on occasion of the association's 50th anniversary. Though this contribution had already been printed, Mr. Lawson proposed that it be printed in the next Newsletter, according to the original intention to issue the history of every national association in the Newsletter.

The committee agreed. The editor of the Newsletter once again drew the attention to the fact that it was most important for him to be informed of all important news such as new members, changes of addresses. fax-numbers etc. This would enable him to publish them as a supplement to the directory. He also urged the committee members to try to sell advertisement space in the Newsletter.

 

7. Directory

See the minutes of the Presidents' Meeting.

 

8. Dictionary

Mr. Lawson reported on the dictionary and its progress. So far manuscripts had been handed in English, Spanish, Italian, Danish and Dutch. They were still missing in Swedish, Japanese, German and French.

Mr. Loeb-Laroque remarked that he had sent a manuscript to Mr. Franco and Mr. B. Rosenthal, but that he had not yet received any answer. The President underlined the great importance of the dictionary and to get it completed and asked Mr. Lawson to contact once again Messrs. Franco and Rosenthal for the French text: “French is a key language and we cannot work on the dictionary without having it.”

 

9. Bibliographical Prize

Dr. Kochcr-Benzing informed the committee that the new leaflets for the 'Triennial Prize for Bibliography' had been sent off to all associations, but only 4 entries had been received so far.

 

10. Security

No further news.

 

11. Congress and Fair in Japan 1990

Mr. Nitta informed the committee that the Japanese president was going to give further information on the congress at the meeting in the afternoon.

In November 1989 the Japanese association would dispatch circulars to the League's members inquiring whether they would take part in the congress and the bookfair in Tokyo. The Japanese association expected about 500 participants for the congress, a number which the committee members considered too high.

Mr. Nitta explained the suggestion, made by the Japanese association, to collect all the money for the books sold and then to transfer it to each exhibitor. This idea derived from the fact that usually all foreign participants leave Japan after about 2 weeks and that most of them don't know the customers there.

For this service, however, a fee of 5% would be charged. Considering all the difficulties such as the long distances between the various countries etc., the committee thought this a good idea and was sure that the presidents would agree with it.

 

12. VAT 1992

See the minutes of the Presidents' Meeting.

Dr. Soave announced that Mr. Chellini was going to give a statement in the afternoon.

 

13. 16 See the minutes of the Presidents' Meeting.

 

17. Any other business

Mr. Ole Dam had celebrated his 40th anniversary as the manager of Boghallens Antikvariat in Copenhagen. Not only during the past but also in the present time, the Danish association as well as the League were greatly indebted to him for his services. In the name of the committee the President would send him a cable of congratulation.

 

 

Meeting of the presidents of the ILAB on Thursday, September 14,1989,

2.30-6.00 p.m. at the Grand Hotel des Bains in Yuerdon

 

Present: All members of the committee. Presidents of Honour: Bob de Graaf, Dr. Kocher-Benzing and John Lawson.

As guest: Mr. Moirandat, the future president of the Swiss association. He was going to be elected the next day.

Apologies were received from Australia, Brazil and Norway. The presidents of the following National Association were present:

Austria, Dr. Hansjorg Krug

Belgium, Claude van Loock

Canada, Michel Brisebois

Denmark, Poul Jan Poulsen

Finland, Cecil Hagelstam

France, Alain Nicolas

Germany, Godebert M. Reiss

Great Britain, Robert Vaughan

Italy, Pietro Chellini

Japan, Kimio Kohketsu

Netherlands, John Vloemans

Sweden, Karna Wachtmeister

Switzerland, Walter Alicke

USA, Michael Ginsberg

 

There were 2 proxies:

Australia, Anthony Rota

Brazil, Walter Alicke

 

The President recalled the voting rights: Each association had one vote, except France, Germany. Great Britain and USA. each of which had 2 votes.

In all there were 20 votes represented.

Mr. Alicke welcomed the audience to Yverdon on behalf of the VEBUKU who had invited the presidents on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the Swiss association.

He explained the reasons for the choice of Yvcrdon: it was the birthplace of Johann Pcstalozzi; it was an important printing and publishing centre- the names Diderot and Voltaire were here to be mentioned - and it was a smaller place where everybody could stay together, as had often been discussed in the League.

 

1. Nomination of Scrutineers

Dr. Kocher-Benzing and Mr. Lawson were nominated scrutineers.

 

2. Approval of the Minutes of the 1988 Presidents Meeting in Paris. The minutes as published in the Newsletter no.41/42 were approved by the assembly and signed by the president.

 

3. President's Report

The President began with a memorial address on Miss Frances Steloff, Mr. John Jenkins and Mr. Fernand de Nobele. He specially remembered the great services the former president of honour, Mr. de Nobele, had rendered to the League.

In continuation of his report he recalled his stay in the United States during which he had visited many libraries, various book-collecting societies, and many booksellers. He had always been anxious to use these visits to promote the interests of the League. On behalf of the ILAB committee he had sent good wishes to the chairmen of every bookfair and also to every newly elected national president he knew of.

In collaboration with Mr. Gerits he had endeavoured to gain more publicity for the Bibliographical Price and also for the League's efforts to maintain the highest standards of ethics and expertise in bookselling.

He had spent much time with correspondence and inquiries concerning the League's position on the matter of the forgeries of Texas documents. Most of the requests for the League to take action had come from librarians and booksellers inside the United States. The committee's aim had been to see that the harm done had been kept to the absolute minimum and he had been sorry to see that the new edition of 'The Book Collector' deplored what it called the 'silence or inaction of the American association' .

The rather curious nature of the League and the way in which it works were not always understood. He was therefore glad to have been asked to speak about the League to the South-Western Branch of the ABA in the United Kingdom shortly after this meeting.

He proposed to point out to them the difference between their own national association and the League. The ABA had a paid secretary and a large committee which met once a month. The League had no paid secretariat and a small committee which met twice a year. It was therefore essential that each member of that committee could be relied on to do what he was pledged to do.

He expressed his thanks to the committee members, as well as to the Presidents of Honour Bob de Graaf, Dr. Kocher-Bcnzing, and John Lawson, and to the Past President Hans Bagger, for their wise counsel and for their readiness to work in the committee.

He also thanked the VEBUKU for their invitation and for their friendly welcome and he wished the Swiss association all the best for the future.

 

4. & 5. Treasurer's Report - Annual Subscriptions

Mr. Weinstein distributed to the presidents the statement of cash receipt and disbursements from January 1st to June 30th, 1989, and commented it. He specially drew attention to the importance of informing him separately when money was transferred directly to the giro account of the League. The bank often failed to tell him where the money had come from.

He informed the presidents of his idea - already put forward in the committee meeting - to charge all exhibitors at national bookfairs a fee of $ 10.00. He justified this by the fact that exhibitors would specially profit from the League's or the respective association's renown and status.

If the presidents were not able to agree to this proposal he would have to put it on the agenda for the meeting in Tokyo and there he would have to ask for a big increase in subscription.

There was a question concerning the amount of subscription the committee would think necessary in case this proposition would be defeated. The President declared that the League would still have to produce the same minimum amount: some associations would not find it easy if subscription rose significantly.

Mr. Ginsbcrg remarked that there were four important bookfairs organized by the ABAA during one year, while other associations would not have any at all. He thought it unfair if only a few associations had to take the whole burden.

To this Mr. Weinstein answered that in England there were 1 to 3 bookfairs during each year and in Germany two.

Mr. Reiss pointed out that the problem in question referred to the Cologne bookfair only as it was the only one organized by the German association. The Stuttgart bookfair had its own rules, as everybody knew. He himself agreed with the proposition and was ready to support it; at the next Stuttgart bookfair in 1990 he would take the opportunity to inform the 'Messe-Ausschuss' of the League's proposal. At the moment he was not able to give any promise.

The President thought it best to begin to collect his fee in Tokyo. Everybody would then have time enough to think it over. He found it a painless way of raising income. Put on the top of other costs it was a very small increase.

Mr. Gerits was also of the opinion that the fee of $ 10.00 should be collected in Tokyo for the first time.

Mr. Nitta accepted the proposition and was ready to charge each exhibitor in Tokyo in 1990 with the fee of $ 10.00. The money ought to be collected by each national association and then sent to the treasurer.

Mr. Nicolas mentioned that the French association still had to fight with financial difficulties deriving from the last congress and it still would need some time to be able to agree with an increase in subscription.

In the voting there were 15 votes in favour, 3 dissenting votes (France and Netherlands) and 2 abstentions for the United States.

 

6. Newsletter - Editor's Report

  Mr. Gerits urged all the presidents to supply information which he could publish in the Newsletter. He underlined that it was most important for him to be informed of all changes within an association. This would enable him to publish this information as a supplement to the directory. As the fax-machine was about to conquer the market, he also asked for the respective fax-numbers.

 

7. Directory

Mr. Edmund Brumme was not able to attend the meeting in Yverdon, but he had sent a letter which Mr. Reiss read to the presidents instead.

Mr. Brumme regretted very much that he was not able to keep to the publishing date of the directory. When he had accepted this work, he had underestimated the difficulties. In addition cooperation with some of the national associations had come about only after a certain delay. The questionnaires of some associations had been returned immediately and had been very carefully filled out; but others had come back with great delay and in a state which had made further inquiries necessary.

He pointed out that advertising in the directory was most important and he asked the presidents to encourage their members to place advertisements. He had intended to publish the directory in an edition of 10,000 copies at a very low price. His calculations had been based on the assumption that the volume of advertising would be nearly the same as the last directory, and that these ads would bear a great part of the production costs. Unfortunately this was not the case.

Like Mr. Gerits, he wanted to be kept informed about new or retired members and about any change within a national association, especially to keep the tiles up to date after the publication of the directory.

Corrections would go out about November 1989; that meant a complete set of proofs to all national associations. Printing could then be started in December 1989 or January 1990 and the first copies could be presented at the Stuttgart bookfair. Mr. Ginsberg asked if there was any risk that the League might to have to take over some of the costs. The President answered that there was no risk for the League since according to the written contract Mr. Brumme worked at his own risk. The League would get 15% of the selling price for each copy sold and 5% of each advertisement. Mr. Reiss informed the presidents that the German association was going to present a copy of the new directory to each of its members- as it had done hitherto- and that he intended to order 500 to 1000 copies for libraries and librarians as well as for important book collectors. They would receive it without charge and he encouraged other presidents to follow the German example.

 

8. Dictionary

Mr. Lawson reported on the dictionary and its progress. So far manuscripts had been handed in in English, Spanish, Italian, Danish and Dutch. They were still missing in Swedish, Japanese, German, and French. Mr. Loeb-Laroque remarked that he had sent a manuscript to Mr. Franco and Mr. B. Rosenthal, but that he had not yet received any answer. The President underlined the great importance of the dictionary, and to get it completed he asked Mr. Lawson to contact once again Messrs. Franco and Rosenthal for the French text: 'French is a key-language and we cannot work on the dictionary without having it'.

Mr. Reiss promised to sec about the German manuscript as soon as he got back to Germany.

 

9. Bibliographical Prize

Dr. Kocher-Benzing informed the presidents that the new leaflets for the 'Triennial Prize for Bibliography' had been sent off to all associations, but only 4 entries had been received so far.

 

10. Security

Mr. Ginsberg informed the assembly that the ABAA had installed a 'post- and fax- chain' from coast to coast.

The National Preservation Office of the British Library had published security guide lines.

 

11. Congress and Book fair in Tokyo

The president of the Japanese association (ABAJ) had prepared an initial schedule for the congress and for the bookfair. A notice in both English and French would be sent to all members of the ILAB before the end of 1989 to ascertain whether they wanted to participate. In March 1990 a formal letter of invitation together with an application from, would be sent to those members who expected to take part.

Participants in the bookfair could choose either the usual type of booth- as had been provided in previous ILAB-fairs - or an simple glass-case. the advantage of which was that books on display were accessible but required less supervision. Details concerning the fair would be mailed along with the notice of these events.

Mr. Nitta added that 50 to 60 booths and 100 glass-cases would be provided.

Mr. Nicholas inquired about the system under which participants would be chosen: according to the date of application or to that of payment?

Mr. Nitta answered that the date of application was the decisive criterion. If there was a great demand the ABAJ would try to enlarge its facilities for exhibition. The price for one booth would be about $ 1,800. - and for the glass-cases about $ 350. - . It was suggested that if there was a great demand for the bookfair the participants should be chosen proportionally according to their country of origin: e.g. equal numbers of colleagues from the Far-East. from the United States, and from Europe.

 

12. VAT 1992

To begin with, Mr. Chellini apologized for boring those presidents who did not belong to countries in the EEC. He had to comment on a subject outside their interest, namely the situation of V A T in January 1992.

At the moment taxation differed a great deal. On books Italy had no V AT at all, just like Great Britain, Spain, Portugal, and Ireland. In 1992 the EEC would introduce a taxation of 4% which was thought quite modest compared with the taxation of other countries of 18 to 20%.

In previous presidents' meetings this subject had been discussed and he drew attention to Newsletter no.41/42.

If Mr. Rota and the committee agreed, Mr. Chellini would be ready to contact Professor Eco, the leader of the European Committee Against Taxing Books. They could try to find out the best way to fight together with other associations, such as the publishers and the new booksellers, against all taxes on books. The aim was the complete renunciation of any tax on books.

The President thanked Mr. Chellini for his excellent report and was of the opinion that every chance had to be taken- with Professor Eco and on our own - to fight against tax on books.

Mr. Rota was ready to fight on a united front with antiquarian booksellers, editors, and printers. The League had already subscribed to the European Committee Against Taxing Books and now the committee waited for members' ideas, ready to think them over carefully.

Mr. Nicolas reported that the sharpened regulations in France for exporting books and autographs were a great problem for SLAM. There were many needless formalities and regulations contradicting the idea of a free trade in a free European market. Mr. Nicolas hoped that these regulations could be cancelled in 1992.

 

13. Forgeries of Texas Documents

Mr. Ginsberg, the president of ABAA, read the 'Status Report on the Texas Forgeries', edited by John Curtis, Chairman of the ABAA Ethics Committee.

This careful and frank report gave a chronological description of all events and named all the suspect documents in the 'Draft copy of the census'.

These events raised serious questions regarding what professional standards the members ought to hold and how detailed and specific a written code of ethics the association ought to have. Two former presidents of the ABAA had been assigned to the task of rewriting the code of ethics.

Because the ABAA had treated this matter as a very serious one from the very beginning, the question of whether any specific action ought or legally could be taken against any member who had been involved in selling these documents, would be reviewed by the entire board of the ABAA at the next meeting in November 1989.

It was beyond doubt that the ABAA had handled this matter in an open and vigorous way and that the statement in 'The Book Collector' was a false one. A conference about these forged documents was to be held in the University of Houston Libraries from November 2, to 4,1989. (See Newsletter no. 41/42). Mr. Rota was going to attend this conference to express the League's point of view.

 

14. The Australian and New Zealand Association's Proposal

Mr. Weinstein spoke in favour of acceptance of point 14 of the agenda, proposed by the Australian and New Zealand association of Antiquarian Booksellers, and to add that all national bookfairs should in future be organized in the ILAB's name. To this he had prepared a statement which read as follows:

'This bookfair is officially sanctioned by the International League of Antiquarian Booksellers, the largest trade organization of its kind in the world.

This means that the consumer can rely upon the experience and professionalism of the participating dealers and the authenticity of the item available for purchase. Simply stated, all books, manuscripts and related material have been carefully examined for completeness and bibliographical accuracy.

The level of inspection will ordinarily depend upon the value of the item(s) offered. Sometimes short notations of detects arc lightly pencilled near the price. More valuable material is usually described in detail on slips that are loosely inserted. Please read them carefully.

Any item is returnable for a full cash refund if defects or bibliographical inaccuracies are found, providing: 1. inspection is made and reported within thirty days of receipt (an immediate phone- call or fax is urged); and 2. material is returned in the same condition as when it was sold.

All ILAB members are obliged to abide by this warranty, and any violator is subject to expulsion from the association. Adress inquiries to: (address of the resp. association). '

 

15. The Australian and Ncw Zealand Association's Proposal

1. This point underlined the importance of collation and the indication of bibliographical references and all presidents approved.

Mr. Weinstein proposed to compare the rules of the League with those of the national associations. To this he presented his own schedule for 'Guidelines for ABAA members' dating from 1982. The different rules should be compared, sent to the presidents, revised and finally approved of in Tokyo. In March 1990 the committee would discuss this subject in detail.

There was common consent on point 15/1.

2. Only 6 voices agreed with point 15/2; 14 were against it.

It was pointed out that those auctioneers who are members of the national associations had their own rules which differ from those of the antiquarian bookdealers.

This concerned especially the time allowed for returns. It was expected that auctioneers would in future handle the time for returns more generously, provided there were real defects in books that had been bought at auctions.

 

17. Future Congresses and President’s Meetings

1990 - Japan, Congress

1991 - Denmark, Presidents' Meeting

1992 - Germany, Congress

1993 - Canada, Presidents' Meeting

1994 - Netherlands, Congress

 

17. Any other business

Mr. Nitta asked whether it was possible for a maximum of 30 antiquarian book dealers from South Korea - who were not organized in an association - to attend the congress inJapan as observers. This was gladly accepted.

Dr. Soave informed the presidents of the ALAI's intention to organize a regular bookfair in Italy once a year. The first on would take place in Milan in March 1990.

 

Yverdon 1989
English