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Submitted by admin on 26 May. 2017
English
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One of London's oldest antiquarian bookshops Maggs Bros., bookseller by appointment to the Queen, closed their premises last year when their leasehold on Berkeley Square had expired after almost 80 years of trading. The opening of the new gallery in Bloombury's Bedford Square, received broad press coverage this week.
One of London's oldest, antiquarian bookshops Maggs Bros., bookseller by appointment to the Queen, closed their premises last year when their leasehold on Berkeley Square had expired after almost 80 years. The opening of the new gallery in Bloombury's Bedford Square, received broad press coverage this week.

The Times writes: "The antiquarian book trade is finally recovering after losing a generation of rare book buyers to the digital world, one of the country’s leading traders has said.
Ed Maggs said that after fallow decades when visits to bookshops plunged and trading on the internet thrived, a younger generation was falling in love with the “smell and heft” of rare books.
Mr Maggs, the fifth generation of his family to run Maggs Bros, which was founded in London in 1853, said that these were “golden days” for older books, adding that prices for books “below the best” were far more accessible."


The Spectator
titles: "Why rare books are thriving in the digital age - One of London’s oldest antiquarian booksellers says young collectors have given business a boost"
Benjamin Maggs, son of Ed Maggs: "
‘I did a degree in the history of books and my dissertation looked at the idea that was prevalent in the 80s and 90s that books were dead and computers were going to take over,’ he says.
‘There was a view that because digital technology was newer and more efficient that it was completely better than paper, but the reality is they are simply different things. I believe strongly there is a reaction to computers. When computers were new people went to them, but because they are now the mainstream, people want to get away from them. As a result the antiquarian book trade is full of young people. There are lots of people just in London between 20 and 30 interested in rare books and we are winning customers over, as well. I see it as part of the same movement as other artisanal things, like craft beer.’"

Fine Books & Collections Magazine quotes Ed Maggs, owner of the firm in the fifth generation: “The last 20 years have seen unprecedented change in our world. Both the purpose and perception of books and manuscripts have changed profoundly, as have their marketplaces. The tectonic shift that has challenged our trade is entering a mature stage: the drift of the two continents of text and object, sometimes colliding, sometimes moving apart, is beginning to settle down. The coming years are going to be tremendously interesting. There’s a burgeoning culture of collecting and interpreting material among youngsters these days, which is based on a need to find new ways of looking at the world, of finding new ways to interpret both the past and the present. The firm has a really strong cadre of young booksellers working here now, and the combination of their enthusiasm with the experience of us oldsters bodes extremely well.”




All articles can be found online.

Link to article in The Spectator from 23 May 2017.

Link to the THE TIMES from 23 May 2017

Link to Fine Books & Collections from 10 May 2017


Image 1: c/o The Times
Image 2: c/o The Spectator
Image 3: c/o Maggs Bros.

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