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Submitted by admin on 09 Mar. 2012
English
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Andreas Vesalius' De Humani Corporis Fabrica, printed in 1543, is one of the most famous of all medical books. On 14th March Vivian Nutton, Honorary Professor in the departments of History and Classics and Ancient History, will present the discovery of Vesalius' own annotated copy of the later 1555 edition at the University of Wawrick. This copy contains hundreds of annotations, corrections of the Latin wording and instructions for the printer. They were meant for a third edition which was never published.

Andreas Vesalius’ De Humani Corporis Fabrica, printed in 1543, is one of the most famous of all medical books. On 14th March Vivian Nutton, Honorary Professor in the departments of History and Classics and Ancient History, will present the discovery of Vesalius’ own annotated copy of the later 1555 edition at the University of Wawrick. This copy contains hundreds of annotations, corrections of the Latin wording and instructions for the printer. They were meant for a third edition which was never published.

"Vesalius, Professor Nutton says, "is now a little kinder to his great Classical predecessor, Galen, ... (and) he is undoubtedly the first medical writer to comment on female religious circumcision (in Ethiopia), and to suggest that the eye is divided by the lens into two very unequal parts."


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